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Can I sue my employer for a hostile work environment and workers comp

1 Answers. Asked on Aug 12th, 2017 on Labor and Employment - Tennessee
More details to this question:
I work at McDonald's and it's a very hostile environment for employees a few managers had threatened me to fight me and put my hand put their hands on me and once before a customer had came in while I was on the clock and broke my nose and two spots and my job and still do nothing about it and I need to find out what I can do about it
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Answered on Aug 13th, 2017 at 6:45 AM

There is a difference between what a lay person would call a "hostile environment" and what the law prohibits.  It certainly sounds like your managers and the customer are hostile. However, an unlawful "hostile environment" is one that is created and directed to you because of one of the following: race, color, sex, national origin, religion, disability or age 40 or older.  If one of these seven protected classes are the reason for the hostile environment, then you can file a legal claim with the EEOC or the Tennessee Human Rights Commission (THRC).  If not, there is no employment law that woudl prohibit this.

Even so, if you are injured at work, you will usually be entitled to workers compensation. I recommend speaking to a workers compensation attorney near you. Also, if you are physically assaulted, you can contact law enforcement.

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Labor and Employment
Labor and employment attorneys can help both employers and workers prevent, address and resolve a variety of issues related to the employer-employee relationship. Small business owners and managers should consult with employment lawyers when crafting employment policies (including those related to hiring, affirmative action, compensation, medical leave and sexual harassment); negotiating employment contracts, non-compete agreements and severance agreements; and resolving employment-related personnel disputes. Workers should talk to a labor and employment law firm before signing any job-related contracts and for help addressing issues related to discrimination, harassment, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accommodations and Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) requests.
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